• Historial Foundation of KU

    Restored, revived and systemised by Patrick McCarthy, Hanshi 9th Dan, the legacy of Koryu Uchinadi Kenpo-jutsu can be traced back to China's Qing Period (1644-1911) Fujian Chinese-based quanfa (kenpo) practices haphazardly introduced and secretly cultivated in Okinawa, during the later part of the old Ryukyu Kingdom.

    Originally pursued for its brutally effective defensive applications, Koryu Uchinadi Kenpo-jutsu is based on the Fujian Chinese-based quanfa disciplines of:

    (1) Hsing (Kata); the original Chinese defensive paradigms vigorously embraced by men of wealth and position

    (2) Qinna (Torite): techniques of seizing and controlling employed by local law enforcement officials

    (3) Shuai Chiao (Tegumi): an old Chinese-based method of clinching and grappling practiced by boys and young men of every age

    (4) Tigwa: a plebeian form of percussive impact brought to the island from the Kingdom of Siam

    (5) Buki-gwa: the art of weapons. These practices were synthesised with the existing local defensive practices and were constantly reinterpreted by law enforcement authorities and like-minded enthusiasts over time.

    What makes KU different ?

    Established as a pragmatic alternative to the plethora of terribly ambiguous and highly dysfunctional styles of "traditional" karate, Koryu Uchinadi Kenpo-jutsu is a modern interpretation of Okinawa's historic combative-like disciplines. 

    It is a completely systematized, cohesive and coherent method of learning Karate and is delivered in a traditional atmosphere, honoring both its culture and pioneers, Koryu Uchinadi Kenpo-jutsu is both and art and a science. 

    Based on common mechanics and supported by immutable principles, the most unique features of Koryu Uchinadi Kenpo-jutsu are its vibrant body dynamics, efficacious taisabaki, functional HAPV-theory and application-based two-person drills, which breathe life back into kata.

    Resurrecting, and systematizing the original contextual premise of old style karate and kata into an easy-to-learn structure.


    Kata (Model Examples & Postures)
    The genuine desire to truly understand the nature and application of traditional kata.

    Muchimi-di (Sticky-hand sensitivity drills)
    Muchimi-di fosters the skill of controlling the attacker by continually pressing, trapping and or hooking.

    Tegumi (Two-person checking, trapping, & close-combat drills)
    Tegumi blasts open the door to discovering kata application.

    Ne/Osae-waza (Grappling & finishing holds)
    Exploring the forgotten heritage of karate — the plethora of tactical situations that go beyond punching and kicking.

    Kansetsu/Tuite-jutsu (Joint Manipulation, Seizing Connective Tissue & Cavity Pressing)
    Learning how to twist bones, lock joints, seize weak parts of the human body and dig into those cavities unprotected by the skeletal structure.

    Shime-waza (Strangulations-chokes/Sealing the Breath)
    Handed down via kata, shime-waza has, unfortunately, become a lost skill in the art of karate until recently.

    Kuzushi, Nage & Ukemi-waza (Balance Displacement, Throwing, Tumbling & Falling/Landing)
    Unfortunately, ending up on the ground, irrespective of how unwelcome the thought may be, is something that is more than likely to happen in an actual physical confrontation.

    Katame-waza (Lessons in Restraint/Immobilization)
    200 brutally effective practices from classical kata, which are culminated in three separate two-person drills.

    Kobudo (The Weapon Art)
    Introducing the participant to the rare style of kobudo called Yamaneryu, as handed down to Kinjo Hiroshi Hanshi, through Grandmaster Oshiro Chojo

     

     

  • What is Koryu Uchinadi Kenpo-jutsu

    Koryu Uchinadi Kenpo-jutsu, (translation; Old Style Okinawan Karate) is a synthesis and contemporary reinterpretation of those classical fighting arts handed down from latter part of Okinawa’s old Ryukyu Kingdom.

    Historical Foundation

    Restored, revived and systemized by Patrick McCarthy, Hanshi 8th Dan, (http://www.koryu-uchinadi.com ) the legacy of Koryu Uchinadi Kenpo-jutsu can be traced back to China’s Qing Period (1644-1911) Fujian Chinese-based quanfa (kenpo) practices haphazardly introduced and secretly cultivated in Okinawa, during the latter part of the old Ryukyu Kingdom.

    Originally pursued for its brutally effective defensive applications, Koryu Uchinadi Kenpo-jutsu is based on the Fujian Chinese-based quanfa (kenpo) disciplines of

    (1) Hsing (Kata); the original Chinese defensive paradigms vigorously embraced by men of wealth and position;

    (2) Qinna (Torite); techniques of seizing and controlling employed by local law enforcement officials;

    (3) Shuai Chiao (Tegumi); an old Chinese-based method of clinching & grappling practiced by boys and young men of every age;

    (4) Tigwa; a plebeian form of percussive impact brought to the island from the Kingdom of Siam and

    (5) Buki-gwa; the art of weapons. These practices were synthesized with the existing local defensive practices and were constantly reinterpreted by law enforcement authorities and like-minded enthusiasts over time.

    Classification of Techniques

    Koryu Uchinadi Kenpo-jutsu includes a broad range (Hybrid) of fundamental physical skills consisting of blocking, kicking, punching [kihon-waza], joint manipulation and limb entanglement (kansetsu-waza), pinning/restraining techniques (katame-waza), seizing nerves and attacking tendons (tori-te waza), attacking anatomically vulnerable points (kyusho-jutsu), blood and air deprivation (shime-waza), balance displacement (nage-waza), ground fighting and grappling techniques (ne-waza) and escapes and counter (gyaku-waza).

    Physical Practice and Theory

    Koryu Uchinadi Kenpo-jutsu is generally characterized by its vibrant body dynamics, efficacious ashisabaki and taisabaki (foot/body movements), classical kata (forms) and is its application-based partner exercises known as tegumi futari-geiko.

    Kata (Forms)

    Kata are a cultural phenomenon of human movement acting as a catalogue of individual “waza” (technique), linked together into geometrical routines forming a specific reference work that preserves the art and bears the imprint of those who passed down the art to succeeding generations.

    There are seventeen empty hand kata that are practiced in Koryu Uchinadi Kenpojutsu today:

    Sanchin – Tai Sabaki – Chokyu (Gekkisai) – Kume Hakutsuru – Yara Kusanku – Naihanchin (Tekki) – Nanshu – Happoren (Paipuren) – Nepai (Nipaipo) – Matsumura Bassai – Rakan-ken – Ryushan – Aragaki Niseishi (Nijushiho) – Aragaki Seisan – Aragaki Sochin – Aragaki Unshu – Wando (Wanduan)

    Tegumi (lit. uniting/cooperating/grappling hands, used in 2-person drills)

    Koryu Uchinadi Kenpo-jutsu emphasizes partner practice drills called tegumi futarigeiko (Te = hand or hands. Amongst its many interpretations “gumi” means to unite, cooperate, and grapple. In this context Tegumi refers to trapping and grappling with one’s hands. Futarigeiko means continuous practice or flow drills.), as one of its main forms of training.

    Practice, of this nature, incorporates the re-enactment of realistic attacks, i.e. chokes, grabs, bear hugs, etc., and a corresponding defence from both a standing position, called tachi-waza, and from the ground, called ne-waza with partners alternate roles between active and passive, attacker and defender. Through the practice of tegumi, the meanings and principles of the movements and postures (defensive composites), integrated within kata, are revealed to the learner.

    When practicing tegumi the learners apply various methods of stomping and kicking with the feet, checking, trapping, hooking and deflecting with the forearms and hands, bumping with the body, grappling, joint locking and striking the vital points with the knuckles, fingertips, etc., in a “continuous flowing” motion using relatively short drills consisting of defensive composites extracted from traditional kata. Concentrating on a limited sequence of movements enables the learner to become accustomed to the feel of the drill quite quickly and allows techniques to become a reflexive action. In this respect, tegumi training is vitally important because in an actual self-defence situation it is important that the execution of techniques is intuitive and automatic, i.e. made on the basis of reflexes; this reflexive response comes from numerous repetitions of tegumi drills.

    Moral Philosophy and Spiritual Foundation

    While physical practice and theory of Koryu Uchinadi Kenpo-jutsu provides for technical competency, it is not seen as an end in itself. The core mission of physical practice and theory is to provide a conduit in which human growth occurs and where the meaning of all things is seen in the context of the whole and thus each thing is done for its intrinsic value, a process in which learner expresses, listens, absorbs, responds, and find them incrementally enlightened through their effort. Thus, Koryu Uchinadi Kenpo-jutsu teaches us that the development of the inner self develops personal humility, respect and tolerance for all things of the universe and it is through this austere training that the learner is able to avoid life’s obstacles and overcome insurmountable odds in order to live happily and without conflict.

     

    Koryu Uchinadi.

    Established as a pragmatic alternative to the plethora of terribly ambiguous and highly dysfunctional styles of "traditional" karate, Koryu Uchinadi Kenpo-jutsu is a modern interpretation of Okinawa's historic combative-like disciplines. 

    A completely systematized, cohesive and coherent method of learning/teaching, delivered in a traditional atmosphere, honouring both its culture and pioneers, Koryu Uchinadi Kenpo-jutsu is both and art and a science. 

    Based on common mechanics and supported by immutable principles, the most unique features of Koryu Uchinadi Kenpo-jutsu are its vibrant body dynamics, efficacious taisabaki, functional HAPV-theory and application-based two-person drills, which breathe life back into kata.

    Resurrecting, and systematizing the original contextual premise of old style karate and kata into an easy-to-learn structure.
    Kata
    (Model Examples & Postures)
    The genuine desire to truly understand the nature and application of traditional kata.

    Muchimi-di
    (Sticky-hand sensitivity drills)
    Muchimi-di fosters the skill of controlling the attacker by continually pressing, trapping and or hooking.

    Tegumi
    (Two-person checking, trapping, & close-combat drills)
    Tegumi blasts open the door to discovering kata application.

    Ne/Osae-waza
    (Grappling & finishing holds)
    Exploring the forgotten heritage of karate — the plethora of tactical situations that go beyond punching and kicking.

    Kansetsu/Tuite-jutsu
    (Joint Manipulation, Seizing Connective Tissue & Cavity Pressing)
    Learning how to twist bones, lock joints, seize weak parts of the human body and dig into those cavities unprotected by the skeletal structure.

    Shime-waza
    (Strangulations-chokes/Sealing the Breath)
    Handed down via kata, shime-waza has, unfortunately, become a lost skill in the art of karate until recently.

    Kuzushi, Nage & Ukemi-waza
    (Balance Displacement, Throwing, Tumbling & Falling/Landing)
    Unfortunately, ending up on the ground, irrespective of how unwelcome the thought may be, is something that is more than likely to happen in an actual physical confrontation.

    Katame-waza
    (Lessons in Restraint/Immobilization)
    200 brutally effective practices from classical kata, which are culminated in three separate two-person drills.

    Kobudo
    (The Weapon Art)
    Introducing the participant to the rare style of kobudo called Yamaneryu, as handed down to Kinjo Hiroshi Hanshi, through Grandmaster Oshiro Chojo

    As traditional Japanese karate kata is linked to the ancestral kata of Okinawan karate — which, in turn, traces its origins back to southern-based quanfa, before the modern emergence of “styles” — it stands to reason that what applied to the fundamental meaning of those progenitor forms also applies to today’s practices.  Having made a study of such history and conceptual practices, author & researcher, Patrick McCarthy, Hanshi 8th degree black belt, has been successful unravelling much of the ambiguity that shrouded the inner-workings of Kata. This has resulted in a much clearer understanding of kata and the original art.

    McCarthy's old-school two-person practices are based upon the most realistic contextual premise imaginable — those original empty-handed and one-on-one acts of physical violence, which habitually plagued the culture in which this art evolved. The ground-breaking results of his study have saved instructors the time and trouble of wandering through an endless minefield of myth and mysticism, and the quagmire of half-truths and self-serving propaganda that so frequently impede the learning process. His old-school two-person drills leave no room for the kind of ambiguity exampled elsewhere in modern/traditional karate; i.e., the kind of ambiguity which has given kata, “a bad name."

    Abstract
    Rather than haphazardly teach "fighting technique," or kata, and then show the application practices, after the fact, McCarthy sensei first introduces the learner to the habitual acts of physical violence [HAPV]---historically representing the original contextual premise on which prescribed template application concepts were first developed---through two-person drills. After gaining a reasonable level of competency [against aggressive resistance] KU learners are taught how to rehearse the prescribed application modules by themselves --- culminating the lessons learned. By linking together the individual modules into unique geometrical configurations something greater than the sum total of its individual parts appear - kata. McCarthy sensei also explains how, practiced by themselves, kata also serve as creative mechanisms through which to express individual prowess while strengthening one's overall mental, physical and holistic conditioning.

    Without question, these old-school practices represent a pathway through which to improve your understanding of karate.

    If you always knew that karate offered more than what you were being taught, and are willing to look outside your peer group, this seminar will definitely appeal to you. If you're looking for progressive mentorship, while not losing any of the value of tradition, attending McCarthy sensei's seminar might be just what you need.

    Patrick McCarthy
    Hanshi 8th Dan
    International Ryukyu Karate Research Society
    www.koryu-uchinadi.com

    So Why look to Koryu Uchinadi Cork to study Martial Arts?

    Throughout the world educators including paediatricians and physiologists have alluded to the fact that the study of Martial Arts is one of the most valuable things you can get involved in.
    It goes way beyond self-defence and can help people of all ages in nearly every aspect of their life. Improve their health and fitness, athletic enhancement, increase confidence, improve concentration; martial arts can help in all these areas.

    Does this sound too good to be true? It’s not. As a matter of fact, many experts agree that in this day and age of escalating obesity and increased violence that if you do nothing else you should improve your fitness and that you should make sure that you learn martial arts.

    Self Defence – “Practice the fight so that you don’t have to” is a phrase that is often used to describe the self-defence benefits of martial arts training. It refers to the fact that a person becomes more confident in their ability to defend themselves thru martial arts training. The need to defend oneself automatically decreases because they unconsciously begin to carry themselves in a more confident manner and that confidence is projected to those around them, making them less vulnerable to predatory behaviour. On top of that, martial arts’ training includes strategic self-defence as well as actual self-defence.

    Athletic Enhancement –training in Koryu Uchinadi offers several advantages. First off, it is amazingly effective in enhancing general coordination because it uses every part of the body in a balanced vibrant way. Upper body, lower body, right side, left side, forward movement, lateral movement, rotational movement, it’s all included in your Koryu Uchinadi training.

    Fitness - The three pieces of the fitness puzzle are strength, flexibility and endurance. Martial arts training demand a balance between the three. Therefore, an individual who trains in Koryu Uchinadi will find their deficiencies greatly enhanced. Also, because of the balance in the three pieces of the fitness puzzle, they are less likely to injure themselves while participating in other athletic endeavours.

    Health - Koryu Uchinadi training is a proven link to better health for people of all ages, but especially young people. It is great exercise and is presented in a safe environment; it offers realistic application practices under the guidance of qualified instructors.

    Concentration - Very few activities engage the mind, body and spirit more than Koryu Uchinadi. Because of this, an individual’s ability to concentrate is greatly enhanced by their training and this concentration tends to be easily transferable to other activities. 

    Respect and Courtesy – Due to the fact that Koryu Uchinadi teaches techniques that could be harmful to others if applied, its instructors are obliged to stress the importance of respect, courtesy and restraint, and something which has been proven time and again is that people who are skilled in Koryu Uchinadi tend to be extremely respectful, considerate and composed.

    Confidence - Koryu Uchinadi virtually always lends to increased confidence in people for a couple of specific reasons. First off, there are no spectators, everyone participates and is judged not against others but more importantly, against one’s own potential. Secondly, the structure of Koryu Uchinadi is built on the concept of preparing students for stressful situations by giving them a series of realistic, short term tasks that they can perfect quickly while keeping them focused on the long term goal. Each time a student   perfect a task their confidence improves coming to realize that with hard work and dedication, anyone can accomplish just about anything.

    The fundamental basis of Koryu Uchinadi is to provide life protection skills. In doing so its practice also conditions the body, cultivates the mind and nurtures the spirit,

    In order to improve health, it’s holistic purpose;

    Build moral character, its social aim;

    Help empower oneself in order to surmount human weakness, its philosophical nature;

    And in doing so, reveal inner peace and tranquillity, it’s spiritual essence.

    Hanshi Patrick McCarthy 9th Dan Hanshi.

  • Koryu Uchinadi - Hanshi Patrick McCarty seminar in Cork